80's General > 80's Computers

C 64

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JASON:
The commodore 64 is, along with the Apple II and the Atari XL computers, the most famous home computer. During its production run from 1982 to 1993 (!) 17 to 22 million (!) of these computers would sell. To put these numbers in perspective, that's more than all the Macintoshes in the world.

The C64 was an up-market version of the VIC-20. A wide range of software packages, games and programming languages was available for this machine which was itself available practically anywhere from a toyshop to a business supplier.

Superficially, the C64 closely resembled the VIC-20. It had the same casing, an identical keyboard configuration and virtually the same interfaces and sockets. But the apparent similarity belies some fundamental differences: a MOS 6510 processor and 64 KB of RAM which was quite unusually large at the time for a model of this price range. The C64 also had the ability to recognise user-established priorities by which 'sprites' (or movable blocks) could move independently of displayed text/graphics, enabling the creation of graphics with up to 8 layers.

Music synthesis was performed by a special sound interface chip. Sound envelope could be controlled on all three voices on a full nine octave of each. It was one of the first computers to offer both a high quality sound chip and graphic resolution with many colors and sprites.

A great range of peripherals was developed for this computer and it can also use several of the Vic 20 peripherals.

TAPE DECK FOR THE GAMES......GREAT.....USED TO TAKE AGES TO LOAD!!

cammyb:
I still play Manic Miner....I recollect playing it in thr early 80's in a mates house - all the lads gathered round the Speccy and a crate of Schlitz to aid the process! Memories.......

JASON:
Schlitz ??

WHAT IS THAT?

Anj:
I had a C64 and used to play this game where you had an aeroplane and had to bomb all the buildings before it crashed.  Can't remember the name of it though.  The C64 is still in my mam's attic!

cammyb:
Schlitz - along with Erlanger and Old Milwaukee it was part of the first wave of American beers to really make inroads into British culture. "More Than A Feeling" was used by Schlitz IIRC. Miles better than the Budweiser/Millers crap that was to follow.

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